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20121207
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the country needs. today we heard president obama's response to the proposal that house speaker john boehner put on the table yesterday. >> the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. >> of out of balance. kind of similar to what republicans said last week when the president sent over his terms. so now what? will they sit down and talk it through? well, not according to at least one senior republican aide who told cnn today, no conversations today, no e-mails, tweets, carrier pigeons. as for boehner and obama, they actually did see each other in person at the white house holiday party last night in black tie. while other lawmakers waited in line to get the photo with the president, multiple sources from both sides of the aisle tell cnn that boehner wasn't among them. so much for holiday cheer. we have this picture. we're wait fworg the day there's a fiscal cliff. there wasn't total silence in washington today. senate majority leader harry reid spoke up. but in his case, in the form of a swipe. >> i sympathyize with john boehner. the key party has a firm grip on the republican p
. speaker john boehner meets this morning with house republicans who are angry at his new pitch to raise $800 billion in tax revenue in the fiscal cliff negotiations. president obama has said there will be no deal unless taxes are raised on the wealthiest americ americans. but staunch conservatives don't want any kind of new taxes. that's where speaker boehner's job gets really tough. on piers morgan tonight newt gingrich said if all else fails, go over the cliff. >> i think that no deal is better than a bad deal. i think going off this cliff is less dangerous than letting things build up for a year or two years to an even bigger cliff. i think that the president clearly has staked out a position of nonseriousness. and i think that it's very difficult for the house republicans right now to find any practical way to get his attention. so, he just won an election. he is feeling very good about himself. he is posturing brilliantly, putting the republicans in a corner. they need to relax. they don't have an election until november 2014. >> senior congressional correspondent dana bash joins m
offered $400 billion in cuts to medicare and other entitlement programs. today john boehner basically said, go fish. >> was not a serious proposal. and so, right now, we're almost nowhere. >> just when we needed someone to not say hey, mom, he was nasty so i can be, too. boehner, like geithner, leapt to the extreme. republicans, the best response to a nonstarter could be to put a real thoughtful compromise deal on the table. an alternative. and as for mr. geithner, he wasn't alone either. remember, mr. president, the promise you made during the campaign? >> the way we do it is $2.50 for every cut, we ask for $1 of additional revenue. >> 2.5 to 1. that means you'd need $4 trillion in spending cuts to match the $1.6 trillion in additional revenue. but you only offered $400 billion, which, of course is $3.6 trillion short before you even get to the stimulus plan and other spending items. ethan pollak, steven moore, you guys ready to play? >> sure. >> we are. >> i know you spoke to our producer today and he seems to think nobody can beat him at this game. the best in the world. let's get strai
and john boehner did the gangnam style, your approval ratings might go up. "outfront" tonight, tom mcclintock of the budget committee. thank you for taking the time. we just showed a lot of your colleagues going home on a wednesday night after working a three-day week. obviously, that's an image that frustrates so many americans. why are people going home before getting this done? >> well, unfortunately, we're not using the standard process where the house passes its version, the is that the passes its version, then a conference committee is very good in revolving impasses like this between the two houses. unfortunately, none of that's being used and i think that's one of the reasons why these things are blocking down now so regularly. we've abandoned a process that works very well when we use it. >> john boehner presented a plan to the president and in that plan, he put $800 billion in revenue from the wealthy on the table. he said he would close loopholes and those people would pay more money. you were a member of the tea party caucus and some in your caucus have slammed boehner's p
with ourselves. >> john boehner made a point at expressing dismay the president hasn't responded two days after the republicans sent him a fiscal cliff counteroffer. >> if the president doesn't agree with our proposal and our outline, i think he's got an obligation to send one to the congress. and a plan that can pass both chambers of congress. >> by trying to keep gop frustration on the president, boehner appears to be keeping conservative lawmakers off his own back for now. >> what's mood inside the conference. >> very united, very supportive with the speaker. >> multiple sources tell cnn in a private meeting with house republicans, boehner got no flow back for producing $800 billion in tax revenue, despite backlash from conservative groups outside congress. >> any complaints about this new revenue? >> i didn't hear anything. >> the speaker has full support of the conference to move forward and get something done for the american people. >> so far, rank and time republicans are allowing boehner to play out this showdown, trying to look reasonable while the president is intransigent. especiall
this country stronger. >> right. again, you know where this is going. john boehner, again, speaker, said we're at a stalemate. is that how you would describe where things are? >> i think we're far apart still, but i think we're moving closer together. again, remember -- >> where are you closer? >> the republicans have said for the first time in decades, if i'm not mistaken, the leaders of the republican party, that they are prepared to raise taxes as part of a deal that helps reduce our long term deficit. what they haven't said is how far they're willing to go on rates and revenues, and that's what we need to see from them. >> they said no increased rates. >> but that's -- but they know this. there's not going to be an agreement without rates going up. there's not -- >> you'll go off the fiscal cliff if the republicans say, sorry, no way are we going to raise rates for the -- on the wealthy. you guys are willing to go off -- >> if republicans are not willing to let rates go back up and we think they should go back to the clinton levels, the time when the american economy was doing exception
page. you have that proposal put forward by speaker john boehner that calls for $800 billion in new tax revenue, but some conservatives think that republicans are giving up too much. take a listen. >> republicans should not be conceding that the federal government needs more money, negotiating with ourselves and treating the president's proposal like it's serious. >> look, i support the speaker and we're actually not very far apart on anything. you know at the end of the day, he has to negotiate a deal. if there is an area we do agree with the president on, that is 98% of the american people getting about 80% of this tax cut shouldn't have their taxes raised. my suggestion was let's take the one area we agree and take it off the table. >> now later this morning, president obama will be speaking and taking questions at the business round table meeting, a white house official saying that the president will make the case that middle-class americans need certainty that their taxes will not go up at the end of the year. he will also make the case that this fiscal cliff will have a negative i
of john boehner and plan. those tea party-backed conservatives say this is something that would help job growth. clearly what we're seeing here is republicans are not speaking with one voice. >> republicans should not be conceding that the federal government needs more money, negotiating with ourselves and treating the president's proposal like it's serious. >> we do agree that 8% of the american people are getting about 80% of this tax cut shouldn't have their taxes raised. my suggestion was let's take the one area we agree and take it off the table. >> but zoraida, as you saw there from the president earlier in that bloomberg interview, he is digging in, saying there can't be a deal unless upper income americans pay more. middle-class americans should get the bush era tax cut extension. is he not backing down from that at all. the president saying in that interview that he's not being stubborn. he's not being partisan but rather that it's, quote, a matter of math. >> we've been talking now for a while that americans blame republicans if a deal doesn't go through. new polling shows amer
in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it needs leadership. >> reporter: at the white house. >> this is available not just here but to everyone in the world who has an internet connection. and i know things are done the old fashioned way sometimes on capitol hill, but i believe they have electricity and internet connections and they can get this. >> reporte
's in a meeting with house speaker john boehner and mitch mcconnell, top republican in the senate, as well as nancy pelosi, the top democrat in the house. now coming out of the meeting with senator reid, i'm not getting much at the moment from sources but one democratic aide tells me the following. he says that we -- this aide told me, we're all on the same page today. it's more about republicans. that goes without saying, because these negotiations really were focusing on the negotiations between the white house and speaker boehner, even before the meeting, which the treasury secretary and speaker boehner, a spokesman gave us this following statement, ashleigh. i want to read to you. he says, we accepted this meeting with the expectation that the white house team will bring a specific plan for real spending cuts, because spending cuts that washington democrats will accept is what is missing from the balanced approach that the president says he wants. clearly, what that tells me, republicans are putting the ball in the white house's court, and democrats' court to come forward with spending
. unfortunately, none of that's being used. >> in that plan john boehner put $800 billion on the table. he said he would close loopholes and those people would pay more money. you're a member of the tea party caucus. some in your caucus have slammed the plan, jim demint among them. do you think john boehner is the guy who's going to get this done? is he going to be able to lead your party to consensus? >> i don't know the answer to that question. what he's trying to do is to mitigate the damage that obama would do with these massive increases in rates. impasse is not an option. means everybody's taxes go up, but if the president has his way, taxes are going to go up on those very wealthy folks making over $200,000, but most are not very wealthy or folks, most are small businesses filing subchapter "s" companies, about 88% of net small business income will be for these taxes when we're depending on them to create two-thirds of the new jobs. boehner's trying to mitigate that mess. i wish him luck. something's going to f to have to give. >> something is going to have to give. from everybody i've talk
for the wealthy. house speaker john boehner wants to close tax loopholes, limit deductions for the wealthy. let's stay on the hill here, let's talk to senior congressional correspondent dana bash. we know the speaker -- we know speaker boehner met with conservative republicans today. did he get any backlash today from his plan? >> reporter: you know what, interestingly it doesn't seem like he did. we know that conservatives are not happy with the idea that their own house republican leadership proposed a plan that includes $800 billion in new revenue. we have seen -- reported on it extensively yesterday and the day before about the e-mail alerts that conservative groups have put out, republican senator jim demint was up-front about the fact he's not happy about it. however, when it comes to speaker boehner's own republican conference, as it is called, we're told they met for an hour and there wasn't backlash, that they were united behind him. it seems as though, brooke, that the speaker has, for now, emphasize for now, been able to turn the frustration within his caucus against the president an
that president obama had a lengthy phone call with house gop leader, the speaker, john boehner. dan lothian is at the white house. dan, what do you know? >> reporter: well, this is the second phone conversation now that the president has had with speaker boehner with regards to the fiscal cliff. this call, according to a source familiar with it, told me it lasted for 28 minutes. this official saying it was hardly short or curt, as had been reported by some news outlets. and my colleague, jessica yellen, heard from another source that said that the president told speaker boehner that he felt that rates had to go up on wealthy americans and that there would be no deal without that. so clearly, there is still some distance between the two sides here. the president believing that wealthy americans need to pay more. those bush era tax cuts should not extend for them. republicans believing that all americans should benefit from those tax cuts, and that now you should put en titlements on the table. of as we see, the officials from the white house going up to capitol hill today, treasury secretary
what is really going on behind the scenes, which is real negotiating. so i asked that question of john boehner, who has been through this kind of negotiating many, many times over many years, if that's what we're seeing or if we're at a stalemate. listen to this . the past 24 hours, is this the necessary public posturing that needs to go on to get an endgame or is there serious stalemate right now? >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult, but if you watched me over the last three weeks, i've been very girded in what i have to say because i don't want to make it harder for me or the president or members of both parties to be able to find common ground. but when i come out the day after the election, and make it clear that republicans will put revenue on the table, i took a great risk. and then the white house spends three weeks trying to develop a proposal and they send one up here, they didn't want to have this extra spending that is actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it is -- it was not a serious propos
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)